The Message – A Series on Call #6: So, Get on With It!, Ephesians 5:6-16

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Sermon:       Series on Call #6: So, Get on With It!
Scripture:    Ephesians 5:6-16
Preacher:     Patrick H. Wrisley, D.Min.
Location:     First Presbyterian Church, DeLand
Date:             March 26, 2017

You may listen to the sermon by clicking here.

This morning, we are culminating our six-week walk through the issue of God’s call on our lives and upon the church.  We have been studying Mark Labberton’s book, Called[1]. The Our scripture this morning is the culmination of Paul’s arguments in his Ephesian letter that God has proven his radical love for us in and through Jesus Christ, and as such, our lives need to be reflecting that fact. This is where the rubber hits the road with our understanding, pursuit and living out our call and vocation by God both as a church and as individual disciples.

Our scripture reading is from Ephesians 5.6-16 and we are going to hear it from a different version than we normally hear the scripture read in worship.  Presbyterian pastor, scholar, and new church planter Eugene Peterson wrote a translation of the Bible his parishioners in Maryland could better understand by using modern vernacular. The result is the Message version of the Bible. I have put it in your bulletin so we can all follow along. Listen, Church, to what the Spirit says each of us.

Ephesians 5:6-16

6-7 Don’t let yourselves get taken in by religious smooth talk. God gets furious with people who are full of religious sales talk but want nothing to do with him. Don’t even hang around people like that.

8-10 You groped your way through that murk once, but no longer. You’re out in the open now. The bright light of Christ makes your way plain. So no more stumbling around. Get on with it! The good, the right, the true—these are the actions appropriate for daylight hours. Figure out what will please Christ, and then do it.

11-16 Don’t waste your time on useless work, mere busywork, the barren pursuits of darkness. Expose these things for the sham they are. It’s a scandal when people waste their lives on things they must do in the darkness where no one will see. Rip the cover off those frauds and see how attractive they look in the light of Christ.

Wake up from your sleep,
Climb out of your coffins;
Christ will show you the light!

So watch your step. Use your head. Make the most of every chance you get. These are desperate times!

The first place to begin is with a simple statement that simply says, “I am a Christian.”  When we make that public statement, it is more than making a statement of what we believe; on the contrary, it’s a dramatic statement on who we are and who it is we follow.  Our life with God is first and foremost a life of following Jesus. Just as Labberton reminds us in the book, Called, Jesus does not tell people to “believe me” but he says to “follow me.”[2]  Our walk with God is first about following Jesus in relationship.  To say that we are a Christian is a radical cultural, social, political and spiritual statement. It is a total breaking with the past and reorienting our lives around God’s call or vocation for us.  Our call and vocation do not emerge from what we believe; on the contrary, it develops and emerges based upon Whose we are and Who it is we follow and have relationship with in this life.

“I am a Christian.”  Say that out loud with me, “I am a Christian.” When you and I say that sentence, we are making a declaration about the orientation of our entire life. It’s a life-altering statement to make but do we realize it when we say it?  As Paul writes in our scripture today,

8-10 You groped your way through that murk once, but no longer. You’re out in the open now. The bright light of Christ makes your way plain. So no more stumbling around. Get on with it! The good, the right, the true—these are the actions appropriate for daylight hours. Figure out what will please Christ, and then do it.

The power of our individual calls, as well as a call as a church, stems from the basic statement, “I am a Christian.”  Everything changes! Our values and priorities. Our relationship with God and with how we relate to others.  Our sense of ethics and what is just as well as what is not. Our habits, how we spend and invest our resources in time, talent and finances.  Everything changes when we say, “I am a Christian.”

But does it really when the rubber hits the road?

Discovering our call requires two actions. First, we are called to focus on what Labberton describes as First Things. Once we focus on the First Things, then and only then, do each of us individually and as a congregation, focus on what he refers to as the Next Things.[3]

Hopefully, by now you know what First Things are since we have been journeying with our series on call for the last six weeks.  The First Thing both in a congregation’s and a Christian’s life is to be in love with God through Jesus Christ. We are no longer fumbling around in the murkiness but we are walking boldly in the Light of God. We know who we are because we know Whose we are and that makes being a Christian such a radical thing, unlike the way the world see Christians today.  Why is Pope Francis such a controversial Pope to the entrenched order of the Catholic See?  It’s because Pope Francis is living his love out like Jesus did and many in the world who want to follow a Catholic religion are being shown by the Pope what it means to live a Christian faith stemming from loving Jesus first! Emerging from our first love, we then begin looking at the Next Things of our calls.

Next Things emerge from the tended fields of our love of God whereby the intersection of our life’s events, jobs, marriages, singleness, friendships, school, advocacy work or just plain life circumstances all come together allowing us to share that love of God with others.  Pope Francis’ call is expressed through his love of Jesus which happens to be the Pope of the worldwide Catholic Church.  His call is that being Pope-ish means being like Jesus.  My call, for example, bubbles up from my passion for God and need of God’s love and then it is expressed through the expression of my love for people, my sensitivities, my gifts of leadership and rhetoric.

Your call is expressed through the First Thing of loving the Lord God with all your heart, soul, mind, and strength.  Your secondary call is expressed through the Next Thing of your unique combination of gifts and graces as they express your love of God in Christ to others in your particular context.

So think with me out loud.  Your primary call is to what? “Love the Lord with all my heart, soul, mind, and strength.”  What’s your Next Thing?  Your personal sense of call arises from the grounding of loving God first and then is expressed to loving others with your particular passions, gifts, graces, context and life circumstances.  So, what’s your next thing?  Can you identify it yet?  If so, like Paul says, then let’s get on with it!

But our calls are not just about what we personally do.  Our calls are grounded in the community of God called the Church. The community of the church gives locus, shape, and impetus for our personal calls to be used. As such, what is this church’s call for the future?  What are we here for anyway?  Would there be a hole left in the community with the absence of First Pres DeLand? Would anyone notice we did not exist?

My friends, this is why we have been spending so much time this Lenten season addressing the issue of call.  It’s an issue that forces us to name our loyalties in this life: Is our loyalty to God or are our loyalties to our own personal passions, interests or “wish dreams” as Dietrich Bonhoeffer calls them? Am I as a Christian using my gifts and graces to make me feel good or are my gifts and graces being used as a basis to share my passionate love of God with others around me?  Is it about “me” or is it about “us”?

Following Easter, my friends, we are going to have two gatherings as a church to hear what you are discerning God telling us to get about doing in our life together and in life with our community.  God wants you and me to thrive and to live and not just simply to get along, survive and get by.  But doing so means focusing on our first love which is Jesus.  Doing so means looking forward not backward, heavenward, not inward, and towards a purpose and not a guess.  The whole purpose of meeting in small groups is to explore our love of God and to learn about God’s call for you in this place at this time.  Hopefully, by the time we gather in our congregational gatherings later in April, we have been discerning who God is calling us to be and are able to share with what you are feeling God is calling us to do as a church as we move forward.  After all, we make a mockery of Lent, Holy Week and Easter if we don’t, as Paul reminds us this morning, get on with it.

The Holy Spirit give understanding to these words. Amen.

Patrick H. Wrisley, D.Min.
Senior Pastor & Teaching Elder
First Presbyterian Church
724 North Woodland Blvd.
DeLand, Florida 32720
pwrisley@drew.edu
Wrisley.org

© 2017 Patrick H. Wrisley. Sermon manuscripts are available for the edification of members and friends of First Presbyterian Church, DeLand, Florida and may not be altered, re-purposed, published or preached without permission.   All rights reserved.

[1]Mark Labberton. Called. The Crisis and Promise of Following Jesus Today (Downers Grove, IL: IVP Books, 2014).
[2] Ibid., 71.
[3] See 87-88.

Series on Call #2: The Responsibilities of an Ambassador, 2 Corinthians 5:16-21

Sermon:       Series on Call #2:  The Responsibilities of an Ambassador
Scripture:    2 Corinthians 5:16-21
Preacher:     Patrick H. Wrisley, D.Min.
Location:     First Presbyterian Church, DeLand
Date:             February 26, 2017, Transfiguration Sunday

You may listen to the sermon by clicking here.

This morning we are continuing in our series on what it means to be called by God. Using Mark Labberton’s book entitled Called, we are meandering our way through Lent exploring God’s call upon us.  If you are reading the book, today’s message is focusing on his chapter 2, “We are called to flourish.” Continue reading “Series on Call #2: The Responsibilities of an Ambassador, 2 Corinthians 5:16-21”

Series on Call: What’s All the Fuss About Having a Call?, Matthew 4.18-23

Sermon:          Series on Our Calling:  #1:  What’s all the fuss about call?
Scripture:
       Matthew 4.18-23
Preacher:        Patrick H. Wrisley, D.Min.
Location:        First Presbyterian Church, DeLand
Date:                February 19, 2017

You may listen to the message bly clicking here.

Continue reading “Series on Call: What’s All the Fuss About Having a Call?, Matthew 4.18-23”