The Message: Getting Broken to Let the Light Shine, Matthew 14.13-21

Sermon:          Getting Broken to Let the Light Shine
Scripture:        Matthew 14:13-21
Preacher:        Patrick H. Wrisley, D.Min.
Location:         First Presbyterian Church, DeLand
Date:                August 6, 2017, Communion Sunday

You may listen to the message by clicking here.

Turn once again in your Bible to Matthew’s Gospel.  For the past few weeks, Michael has been looking at some parables in Matthew 13 describing what people do when they hear the Word of God as well as stories about what the Kingdom of Heaven is like.  Matthew then has Jesus making a brief stop in his hometown where he is summarily dismissed by the folks he grew up with.  Matthew then moves into the next chapter by looking at the fate of Jesus’ cousin, John the Baptist as he is beheaded by King Herod because Herod, in a moment of passion, makes a hyperbolic promise to his step-daughter for the sensual dance she has just provided Herod and his guests. He is so overwhelmed by her dance that he blurts out, “Wow!  Incredible! I’ll give you anything you want for that dance – up to half of my kingdom!” The step-daughter calls his bluff and replies, “Okay, daddy.  Give me the head of John the Baptist on a platter!”  Herod had no choice to but to abide by his amoral daughter’s wish so as not to lose face in front of his party guests.  John the Baptist – the one who God sent to prepare the way, to be the spiritual rooster that crowed to wake people up – is dead. And now, as the late Paul Harvey would say on his radio program, “Here is the rest of the Story!

We are picking up with Matthew 14 beginning with verse 13. Listen to the Word of the Lord!

Matthew 14:13-21

14.13Now when Jesus heard this, he withdrew from there in a boat to a deserted place by himself. But when the crowds heard it, they followed him on foot from the towns. 14When he went ashore, he saw a great crowd; and he had compassion for them and cured their sick. 15When it was evening, the disciples came to him and said, “This is a deserted place, and the hour is now late; send the crowds away so that they may go into the villages and buy food for themselves.” 16Jesus said to them, “They need not go away; you give them something to eat.” 17They replied, “We have nothing here but five loaves and two fish.” 18And he said, “Bring them here to me.” 19Then he ordered the crowds to sit down on the grass. Taking the five loaves and the two fish, he looked up to heaven, and blessed and broke the loaves, and gave them to the disciples, and the disciples gave them to the crowds. 20And all ate and were filled; and they took up what was left over of the broken pieces, twelve baskets full. 21And those who ate were about five thousand men, besides women and children. [1]

So, Jesus has been blown-off by the people in his hometown of Nazareth[2].  His cousin John, the one who was to get people ready for the Messiah’s return, has just been murdered for sport. By all appearances, things are not looking too good for Jesus and his fledgling movement. People are either hot or cold towards what he says and the ones who were hot about it were violent in expressing their feelings.  Jesus, the man, is soaking all this in.

If we were walking along next to him, we might see in his face a sad resignation that people just aren’t getting it. Parts of his message expressed through his teaching and works are getting through, but it seems at this point, people are only responding to the degree that they can benefit from Jesus. We look in Jesus’s eyes and see frustration, fatigue, and feelings of loss.

So, what does he do?  He tries to disappear. The words from David’s Psalm 55:4-8 come to mind in this instance.  I can imagine Jesus reflecting,

My heart is in anguish within me,
the terrors of death have fallen upon me.
Fear and trembling come upon me,
and horror overwhelms me.
And I say, ‘O that I had wings like a dove!
I would fly away and be at rest;
truly, I would flee far away;
I would lodge in the wilderness;
I would hurry to find a shelter for myself
from the raging wind and tempest.’

Have you ever had those moments when things in life weren’t going your way and you simply had to get off and be alone?  You needed time to think. Pray. Grouse. Shake your fist at God and yell, “What gives?” You need to hear the crashing sound of silence or the lapping of the water on the side of a boat that brings serenity to your soul. This is what Jesus is experiencing now. As soon as he heard about cousin John’s death he needed to get away and simply ‘be.’ But something interesting happens.

Verse 13 says, “But when the crowds heard it, they followed him.”  There are two possible ways to read this line and it revolves around what the crowds are responding to in the story.  The first part of the verse indicates that when Jesus heard ‘it’, i.e. the news of John’s death, he had to get away. What is the ‘it’ the crowds are responding to at this point?

On one hand, when the crowds heard ‘it’, i.e. Jesus had left, they went searching for him.  On the other hand, one can easily understand the reading as though once the crowd, like Jesus, heard ‘it’, i.e. John the Baptist had been killed, they too needed to go and discover what all this meant and so they naturally went to find Jesus who might give some answers. This fits nicely with the storyline and they are every bit as anxious about the situation as Jesus is. Whereas there were two Jewish spiritual reformers shaking things up in Judea, now there is only one figurehead in front of this new spiritual movement and it’s Jesus. It makes perfect sense for the people to follow the leader to see what is going to happen next.

Jesus slips off in a boat and makes his way to an unidentified location across the water.  The anxious crowd, upwards between five to seven thousand people, are moving along the coastline trying to spot where Jesus was headed. Jesus lands the boat and sees all the people and puts his own grief on hold, puts all the questions rattling around his brain on pause, and immediately does what he does best: He has deep compassion for the people.  He heals them.  He casts out spirits.  He encourages.  He inspires. He begins to prepare for their future, too.

John’s death seems to be a wake-up call of sorts for Jesus.  Yes, he knew he and the Message of Compassion and Justice would be met with some resistance but this whole thing with Herod and John seems to have taken it to a new, violent level of resistance. In some way, John’s death was foreshadowing Jesus’ own and in his deep places, Jesus knew that, too. It is easy to imagine our Lord looking at the crowds and then at the motley crew we know as the Twelve and Jesus reflecting, “What have I gotten you into?”

The feeding of the 5,000, the only Story aside the Easter account, is in all four Gospels. For the early church, this was a pivotal Story.  Did you ever stop to wonder why?

It is not only a Story that foreshadows the Lord’s Supper whereby Jesus gives himself totally to the cause by becoming broken and shared among those around the Table, it is a Story in which Jesus demonstrates that for the movement to continue forward in his absence, for the movement to endure, the Twelve would need to learn how to carry forward on their own.  The feeding of the 5,000 is not only for the benefit of the ones who are getting fed with bread and fish; it is a Story designed to teach the Twelve disciples and ultimately you and me a valuable lesson about following Jesus.

Confronted with the crowds, the late hour of the day, and the lack of provisions,

the disciples tell Jesus to send the crowd away so they can go feed themselves. Jesus astutely turns the problem back to the disciples: You give them something to eat.  Jesus realizes his fate would be along the lines of his cousin John’s. The disciples needed to begin seeing they could carry the message of restoration and reform forward themselves.  The simple lesson Jesus is offering the disciples is this:  Look for opportunities God can use to create miracles and understand that in order to be effective, they will need to give thanks to God and then allow themselves to be broken and shared among the people. Following Christ is not for the faint of heart; it is demanding and it will cost you your very life.

Look for opportunities. Give thanks. Be broken and shared.

Jesus was indicating what would not only happen to him but he was showing his disciples what is required for us in our life.  We are to look for opportunities to serve others, we are to give God thanks for those opportunities presented, and we are to be broken and shared among the people in compassionate, active love.

What opportunities are available in your own personal life that God can use for the Kingdom of heaven’s ends? Like the little boy and the fish, it’s right there if we only look!

Is your allegiance to Jesus deep enough to give God thanks as you are broken and given to others for the sake of Christ and for his love of others around us?

Come to the Table of Grace and Call this morning, my friends! Jesus is showing us how we are to live as Christ-followers and as a church.  What needs to be broken in you so that you can feed others in the name of the Holy One? Pride? Greed? Feelings of inconvenience? Hate and prejudice? Lust? Power? Come to the Table and ask the Holy Spirit to reveal to you the opportunities before you and this church, so that you can be – that we can be as a Body of Christ – broken in order to be shared and be a blessing to others. The Table is a great place to remember our brokenness so that we can let the Light of Christ Shine in and through us.  So be it.

Patrick H. Wrisley, D.Min.
Senior Pastor & Teaching Elder
First Presbyterian Church
724 North Woodland Blvd.
DeLand, Florida 32720
pwrisley@drew.edu
Wrisley.org

© 2017 Patrick H. Wrisley. Sermon manuscripts are available for the edification of members and friends of First Presbyterian Church, DeLand, Florida and may not be altered, re-purposed, published or preached without permission.   All rights reserved.

[1] The New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

[2] Mathew 13:53-58.